'How the Future looked in 1964: The Picturephone' in the Upshot

In New York on Dec. 21, 1965, Keum Ja Kim, 15, a soloist with the World Vision Orphan Choir, used the Picturephone to audition for Robert Merrill, a star with the Metropolitan Opera, who was in Washington to sing at the White House. CreditBettmann/Corbis

In New York on Dec. 21, 1965, Keum Ja Kim, 15, a soloist with the World Vision Orphan Choir, used the Picturephone to audition for Robert Merrill, a star with the Metropolitan Opera, who was in Washington to sing at the White House. CreditBettmann/Corbis

'Revolutionizing technology products was the microchip, invented only about a decade earlier. In a little-noticed reference in an electronics magazine only a year later, an engineer named Gordon Moore noted that the number of components in integrated circuits had doubled every year. Later dubbed Moore’s Law, and altered slightly over the years, the postulation that computing power grows exponentially — and the corollary that the price of computing power drops at a steady rate — explained the driving force that made the videophone call free.'

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