'Growing Use of Police Body Cameras Raising Privacy Concerns' in The L. A. Times

A police officer wears a body camera at a rally for Michael Brown in Ferguson, Mo. Brown, an unarmed black man, was shot and killed by Ferguson police in August. The department began equipping officers with body cameras after the shooting. (Aaron P. Bernstein / Getty Images)

A police officer wears a body camera at a rally for Michael Brown in Ferguson, Mo. Brown, an unarmed black man, was shot and killed by Ferguson police in August. The department began equipping officers with body cameras after the shooting. (Aaron P. Bernstein / Getty Images)

'For many departments, questions remain about when officers should be allowed to turn off such cameras — especially in cases involving domestic violence or rape victims — and the extent to which video could be made public.

Such video "sometimes captures people at the worst moments of their lives," American Civil Liberties Union senior policy analyst Jay Stanley said.

"You don't want to see videos of that uploaded to the Internet for titillation and gawking," he said.

Video from dashboard cameras in police cars, a more widely used technology, has long been exploited for entertainment purposes. Internet users have posted dash-cam videos of arrests of naked women to YouTube, and TMZ sometimes obtains police videos of athletes and celebrities during minor or embarrassing traffic stops, turning officers into unwitting paparazzi.'

Read the article here.